Contact Us at 256-658-9955
k8 photo

Blog

Point and shoot, plastic and disposable cameras, Oh my!

I have found that in our current society we often get wrapped up in this need to buy the biggest, best and newest of everything. I'm guilty too. We've all thought, at one time or another, that we NEED the newest lens, or computer, or light kit - or whatever it may be - in order to accomplish a shoot the way that we want to. Sure, they may help, or make it easier in some ways, but is art not also about the challenges, the creative process, finding ways around things? 

As a reminder to myself I often look to one of my favorite photos, from a series taken in school, that was shot with a holga - a plastic medium format camera notorious for light leaks and unpredictable outcomes. The image is of the moon rising over a church in Savannah, Ga. It was taken at night from the rooftop of a building nearby. I was able to keep the frame moderately still, for the guessed exposure, by balancing the camera on top of my head while I held the shutter down. So you see, adventure, lighting challenges and high up rooftops created an image I keep hanging right next to my desk 10 years later :)

 10 years after school, I still have my holga photo hanging next to my desk. 

10 years after school, I still have my holga photo hanging next to my desk. 

 Church over Savannah - Shot with a plastic camera, using my head as a tripod and guessing the exposure. 

Church over Savannah - Shot with a plastic camera, using my head as a tripod and guessing the exposure. 


Here are some samples of a few more images that I have shot on point and shoots, plastic, and disposable cameras. Never forget that there are no rules to art, and in the end photography is just playing with light. So have fun, go make a pinhole camera from a cereal box and see what you can come up with!

 My good friend Daniel, photographed with a Holga resting on the table. I took this shot while we took a break from walking during a shooting expedition around Savannah with our Holgas (you can see his resting on the table in front of him).

My good friend Daniel, photographed with a Holga resting on the table. I took this shot while we took a break from walking during a shooting expedition around Savannah with our Holgas (you can see his resting on the table in front of him).

 This is actually a multiple exposure shot with the Holga inside an old abandoned building in Savannah. I would later take "church over savannah" on the rooftop of this building. 

This is actually a multiple exposure shot with the Holga inside an old abandoned building in Savannah. I would later take "church over savannah" on the rooftop of this building. 

 Porttrait of my friend's dog, Remy, photographed with the Holga in Forsythe park, Savannah. You can see where the batteries for the Holga's flash got in the way on the sides of the frame. After exposing this roll I used electrical tape to better secure the AA batteries into their place, so as to keep them out of future shots :)

Porttrait of my friend's dog, Remy, photographed with the Holga in Forsythe park, Savannah. You can see where the batteries for the Holga's flash got in the way on the sides of the frame. After exposing this roll I used electrical tape to better secure the AA batteries into their place, so as to keep them out of future shots :)

 Terra.  While living in Chicago I began a series of eye portraits of my friends. I shot all of them on a tiny point and shoot Nikon that happened to have excellent macro capabilities. I selected the iris and pupil in photoshop, slightly enhanced their contrast, and made the rest of the image black and white. What you see is the actual eye color, I did not manipulate that at all. 

Terra.

While living in Chicago I began a series of eye portraits of my friends. I shot all of them on a tiny point and shoot Nikon that happened to have excellent macro capabilities. I selected the iris and pupil in photoshop, slightly enhanced their contrast, and made the rest of the image black and white. What you see is the actual eye color, I did not manipulate that at all. 

 Bailey.

Bailey.

 Nina.

Nina.

 Chrissy.

Chrissy.

 These images are the first part of a series I hope to one day continue, of people suspended in space. My plan is to eventually include dancers, people on trampolines, etc.   These images were taken of my friend, Jocelyn, during a trip we took with friends to Disney World back in 2005. I used a disposable, underwater camera from CVS to take them. I applied a blue color cast and vignette in photoshop for the final effect. 

These images are the first part of a series I hope to one day continue, of people suspended in space. My plan is to eventually include dancers, people on trampolines, etc. 

These images were taken of my friend, Jocelyn, during a trip we took with friends to Disney World back in 2005. I used a disposable, underwater camera from CVS to take them. I applied a blue color cast and vignette in photoshop for the final effect. 

 Navy Pier, Chicago.   Remember that Nikon point and shoot that I took the eye portraits with? Well, this was shot with the same little camera. I took this image from the top of the ferris wheel in Navy Pier during my first week in Chicago. The Vignette and color cast were applied in post production. 

Navy Pier, Chicago. 

Remember that Nikon point and shoot that I took the eye portraits with? Well, this was shot with the same little camera. I took this image from the top of the ferris wheel in Navy Pier during my first week in Chicago. The Vignette and color cast were applied in post production. 

So there you have it, a small sampling of photographs shot in unlikely circumstances with not so traditional cameras.